A report finds many juveniles accused of crimes never see a lawyer or receive ineffective legal advice.

A report finds many juveniles accused of crimes never see a lawyer or receive ineffective legal advice. It finds if they do get an attorney, it is usually the least experienced or the most burned out.


DAVID GREENE, HOST: Everybody knows when you are accused of a crime, you get a lawyer. But in practice, that is not the case for thousands of kids. The Justice Department says about half the young people locked up in detention facilities never had an attorney. And now, a new report finds that even when juveniles do get legal advice, it often comes from lawyers who urge them to plead guilty. Here’s NPR’s Carrie Johnson.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: The young woman from Baltimore sitting across the table and sipping a cup of tea entered the justice system when she was just eight years old. Home was no longer a safe place because, she says, she was being raped by someone close to her. NPR’S not using her name because she’s the victim of abuse. The state removed her from her home and put her into a facility, where she says another juvenile beat her with a lock.

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